Ultra-Low-Power Energy-Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs)

In this project we are developing Energy-Harvesting Active Networked Tags (EnHANTs). EnHANTs are small, flexible, and energetically self-reliant devices that can be attached to objects that are traditionally not networked (e.g., books, furniture, walls, doors, toys, keys, clothing, and produce), thereby providing the infrastructure for various novel tracking applications. Examples of these applications include locating misplaced items, continuous monitoring of objects (items in a store, boxes in transit), and determining locations of disaster survivors.
Recent advances in ultra-low-power wireless communications, ultra-wideband (UWB) circuit design, and organic electronic harvesting techniques will enable the realization of EnHANTs in the near future. In order for EnHANTs to rely on harvested energy, they have to spend significantly less energy than Bluetooth, Zigbee, and IEEE 802.15.4a devices. Moreover, the harvesting components and the ultra-low-power physical layer have special characteristics whose implications on the higher layers have yet to be studied (e.g., when using ultra-low-power circuits, the energy required to receive a bit is significantly higher than the energy required to transmit a bit).
The objective of the project is to design hardware, algorithms, and software to enable the realization of EnHANTs. This interdisciplinary project includes 5 PIs in the departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Columbia University with expertise in energy-harvesting devices and techniques, ultra-low power integrated circuits, and energy efficient communications and networking protocols.

Luca Carloni

Computer Science
Associate Professor
luca@cs.columbia.edu

Luca Carloni is an associate professor of computer science at Columbia Engineering. He received a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation in 2006, was selected as an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in 2008, and received the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Young Investigator Award in 2010. Carloni’s research interests include methodologies and tools for multi-core system-on-chip platforms with emphasis on system-level design and communication synthesis, networks-on-chip, embedded software, and distributed embedded systems.

Peter Kinget

Electrical Engineering
Professor
peter.kinget@columbia.edu

Peter Kinget is a professor of electrical engineering at Columbia Engineering. His research interests are in analog, RF and power integrated circuits in nanoscale CMOS technologies and the applications they enable in communications, sensing and energy. Kinget has worked in industrial research and development at Bell Laboratories, Broadcom, Celight, and Multilink before joining the electrical engineering faculty at Columbia.

Ioannis (John) Kymissis

Electrical Engineering
Assistant Professor
ik2174@columbia.edu

Ioannis (John) Kymissis is an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Columbia Engineering. His area of specialization is solid state electronics and device fabrication. He researches thin film devices and systems, especially focusing on optoelectronic and sensing devices based on organic and amorphous metal oxide thin film materials. Current areas of research include investigations into device performance, fabrication, packaging, and device driving. Kymissis graduated with his S.B., M.Eng., and Ph.D.

Daniel Stuart Rubenstein

Computer Science
Associate Professor
danielr@columbia.edu

Dan Rubenstein is an associate professor in the Department of Computer Science at Columbia. His research interests are in network technologies, applications, and performance analysis. He is an editor of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, program chair of Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Sigmetrics 2011, and has received an NSF CAREER Award, IBM Faculty Award, and three paper awards from ACM SIGMETRICS 2000, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Conference on Network Protocols CNP 2003, and ACM CoNext 2008. Rubenstein received his Ph.D.

Mingoo Seok

Electrical Engineering
Assistant Professor
ms4415@columbia.edu

Mingoo Seok is an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Columbia Engineering. Prior to joining Columbia in 2011, Seok was a member of the technical staff in the Systems and Applications R&D Center of Texas Instruments in Dallas, TX. His research interests cover extreme energy-efficient circuit and system design that can benefit various cyber physical systems for ubiquitous and reliable sensing, computation and communication.

Xiaodong Wang

Electrical Engineering
Professor
wangx@ee.columbia.edu

Xiaodong Wang is a professor of electrical engineering at Columbia Engineering. His research interests fall in the general areas of computing, signal processing, and communications, and he has published extensively in these areas. Among his publications is a recent book entitled, Wireless Communication Systems: Advanced Techniques for Signal Reception, published by Prentice Hall in 2003. He received the 1999 NSF CAREER Award, and the 2001 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Communications Society and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award.

Gil Zussman

Electrical Engineering
Associate Professor
Wireless and Mobile Networking (WiMNet) Lab
Director
gil@ee.columbia.edu

Gil Zussman is associate professor of electrical engineering at Columbia Engineering. His research interests are in the area of wireless networks. Zussman has served on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications and of Ad Hoc Networks, and as the Technical Program Committee chair of IFIP Performance 2011. He is a recipient of the Fulbright Fellowship and the Marie Curie Outgoing International Fellowship, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Young Investigator Award, and the NSF CAREER Award.

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